work

New Books Help People With Learning Disabilities Who Want To Work

New Books Help People With Learning Disabilities Who Want To Work

Only 6% of people with learning disabilities has a job whereas around 60% actually want to go out and work.  

The Grange Charity in Bookham has been working with the specialist learning disability publisher, Beyond Words Books, to highlight the serious issue of disability and work.

Grange resident, Katie Coen, and Work Experience Co ordinator, Mel Sheehan, were present at the launch of the books at the House of Lords last week. 

Beyond Words Books was created by Baroness Sheila Hollins of Wimbledon (a Bookham resident), who had the idea of using wordless illustrated books to help people with learning disabilities tackle everyday issues of life.

The trouble with work - facing discrimination due to your disability

Scope Lasian discrimination

Despite disability discrimination being illegal under the Equality Act 2010, many people with disabilities find getting work difficult – either through direct discrimination during the application process, or because health issues affect their working pattern. 

In a recent case, a DWP worker was awarded £26,000 in compensation after his employer was found to have discriminated against him, after he took time off for medical reasons. Barrie Caulcutt had suffered an athmas attack at work and his employer had called him "a whinger". He was given a written warning for taking two and a half days off sick more than he was allowed.